More than just an inter-“face:” Designing virtual humans for teaching and learning

More than just an inter-“face:” Designing virtual humans for teaching and learning

Wednesday, February 8, 2017 (12:00 PM)
Payne Hall West, Results Room 129, Tempe Campus
More than just an inter-“face:” Designing virtual humans for teaching and learning
Wednesday, February 8, 2017 (Noon)
Payne Hall West, Results Room 129, Tempe Campus

Simulating the social aspects of teaching and learning, virtual humans (e.g., pedagogical agents) are powerful vehicles for impacting learning and motivational outcomes. This presentation addessed questions including: How do we best design virtual humans to simulate the social aspects of teaching and learning? Where is their greatest potential for impact? What are the untapped possibilities?


Amy Baylor

Program Officer at the National Science Foundation
Co-lead for the Cyberlearning and Future Learning Technologies Program

Amy L. Baylor is currently a Program Officer at the National Science Foundation in the area of Cyberlearning (advanced learning technologies), serving as co-lead for the Cyberlearning and Future Learning Technologies program. She has over 20 years of experience in the field of advanced learning technologies on both sides of the table- as a Principal Investigator and also as a funding director.  This is her second tour of duty at NSF - from 2006-2009 she was on loan from Florida State University (FSU) to serve as Lead and Founding Program Officer in Human-Centered Computing in the Computer Information Science & Engineering (CISE) Directorate at NSF in the division of Information and Intelligent Systems (IIS). 

In academia, she was a tenured professor at Florida State University (FSU) with a joint appointment in Instructional Systems and Information Technology (from 1999-2010) and at San Diego State University in Educational Technology from 1997-1999.  From 2011-2015 she ran a consulting business in the Washington DC area that advised corporate and government clients on strategy regarding educational technology research and development.

Regarding her work with virtual humans, she has over 75 refereed publications in the area and one of her articles in the International Journal of Artificial Intelligence and Education was recognized as one the most highly-cited articles in the history of the journal.  She has been invited to present at numerous international venues, including the National Academy of Sciences and the Royal Society in Great Britain where she was part of the most oversold session in the 350+ year history of the Society, “Computation of Emotion in Man and Machines”.  Currently at NSF she is a member of an NSF-wide working group on the Future of Work at the Human Technology Frontier and she is leading initiatives to support the funding of affect as it relates to learning with technology.